WHO WE WORK WITH Case Managers Solicitors Individuals Charities / CICS Employers
TALK TO US United Rehab Solutions Ltd. Bodeugan Farm, Waen, St Asaph, Denbighshire, LL17 0DT Phone: 01745 583156 Email: hello@unitedrehab.solutions

TRACHEOSTOMY CARE

Description

A tracheostomy is an opening created at the front of the neck so a tube can be inserted into the windpipe (trachea) to help you breathe. They can be in place for a short period of time or for life.

Conditions

Congenital defects of the upper airways (in children). “Congenital” means that the defects are present at birth. Airway injuries from smoke, steam, or chemical burns. Severe allergic reactions or infections. Removal of the larynx (for example, from cancer). Long-term coma. Neuromuscular diseases that paralyze or weaken the muscles and nerves involved in breathing. Spinal cord injuries.

Benefits

Advantages of a tracheotomy – It provides a small, secure connection to your airway for suctioning and for mechanical ventilation. Nebulized medication (sprays or mists) and oxygen can be delivered through it. It is the method of choice for long term mechanical ventilation, when bulbar involvement makes non-invasive ventilation impossible and when life support mechanical ventilation is desired. It leaves the face free and avoids headgear, straps, and skin pressures problems. Doctors, nurses, and respiratory therapists are familiar with tracheostomy care. Disadvantages of a tracheostomy – Some people feel it is too invasive, increases their disability and dependence, makes them look less “normal,” and might prevent them from wearing certain articles of clothing (collar or tie). Secretions require frequent suctioning, often at night as well as during the day. Coughing to clear the smaller airways is difficult. The tracheostomy site (stoma) can become infected, bleed, or develop inflammatory tissue (granulations) that need to be removed. It requires some skill and makes care more complicated.

Who’s Involved

The Speech and Language Therapist and the Rehabilitation Nurse work very closely to monitor all of our clients with tracheostomies. They provide – Training to families and carers Liaise with the NHS re tube selection and airway management Tube and stoma care Tube changing and decannulation

If you would like to discuss this or any other service please ring

01745 583156 or email us hello@unitedrehab.solutions

TRACHEOSTOMY CARE

Description

A tracheostomy is an opening created at the front of the neck so a tube can be inserted into the windpipe (trachea) to help you breathe. They can be in place for a short period of time or for life.

Conditions

Congenital defects of the upper airways (in children). “Congenital” means that the defects are present at birth. Airway injuries from smoke, steam, or chemical burns. Severe allergic reactions or infections. Removal of the larynx (for example, from cancer). Long-term coma. Neuromuscular diseases that paralyze or weaken the muscles and nerves involved in breathing. Spinal cord injuries.

Benefits

Advantages of a tracheotomy – It provides a small, secure connection to your airway for suctioning and for mechanical ventilation. Nebulized medication (sprays or mists) and oxygen can be delivered through it. It is the method of choice for long term mechanical ventilation, when bulbar involvement makes non-invasive ventilation impossible and when life support mechanical ventilation is desired. It leaves the face free and avoids headgear, straps, and skin pressures problems. Doctors, nurses, and respiratory therapists are familiar with tracheostomy care. Disadvantages of a tracheostomy – Some people feel it is too invasive, increases their disability and dependence, makes them look less “normal,” and might prevent them from wearing certain articles of clothing (collar or tie). Secretions require frequent suctioning, often at night as well as during the day. Coughing to clear the smaller airways is difficult. The tracheostomy site (stoma) can become infected, bleed, or develop inflammatory tissue (granulations) that need to be removed. It requires some skill and makes care more complicated.

Who’s Involved

The Speech and Language Therapist and the Rehabilitation Nurse work very closely to monitor all of our clients with tracheostomies. They provide – Training to families and carers Liaise with the NHS re tube selection and airway management Tube and stoma care Tube changing and decannulation

If you would like to discuss

this or any other service

please ring 01745 583156 or

email us

hello@unitedrehab.solutions

WHO WE WORK WITH Case Managers Solicitors Individuals Charities / CICS Employers
TALK TO US United Rehab Solutions Ltd. Bodeugan Farm, Waen, St Asaph, Denbighshire, LL17 0DT Phone: 01745 583156 Email: hello@unitedrehab.solutions